Best food plot mix/seed/plant

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Arkansas
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    Post Best food plot mix/seed/plant

    Hey guys, I was needing some advice on food plots. This year will be my first year of plotting, and i was wondering what a good seed/mix was. I have heard that throw and grow works well, and that the deer like clovers, but i am not an expert in this field. I need to know soon because i need to be planting now!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Eastern Ohio
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    Default Best food plot mix/seed/plant

    A lot depends on where your at. Are you looking for something to last deep into the cold weather or are you looking for something to add to available forage right now? I don't use food plots and probably never will but I've put plots in for people and you got to start by asking what are you wanting this plot to do. The last plot I did was a mixture of a fast rising browse to get deer coming to the plot and a slower growing heartier seed that could handle cold, frost, and heavy browse. If your going to plant something for early season use something that comes in quick and that deer like. Clover is fine. If your hoping it runs into October or early nov use a seed that can survive the frost and comes up in bulk

  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    Mississippi
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    Default

    Like WStreblo said depends on a lot of things. What you want the plot to do...the size of the plots...type of soil, how much sunlight the plot gets, what will withstand the winter weather conditions in your area, etc. Clover mixes are good but I prefer planting them in the spring. Planting them now is OK but they really won't put out the forage you'd want until next spring & summer. If you're planting plots that aren't very big you want something that can withstand heavy browsing pressure like cereal grains. Some forage options like brassicas require a good hard frost or freeze before deer will hit them to get the sugars into the plant. There's a host of other options like cow peas to add to a mix too.

    Overall, it's usually a good idea to mix a few different types of seeds into your plots. It's a lot cheaper if you plan your own mix rather than buying the name brand seed mixes advertised so much on the hunting shows on TV. Planting a mix of seeds is insurance. If 1 fails for whatever reason you have the others still growing in your plots. Down here in MS we planted a mix of cereal grains in all our plots...wheat, oats, & rye. Winters are not what you'd call harsh down here. In MO this year we're planting a mix of Buck Forage Oats & turnips. Turnips are mainly for the late season since they will need a good freeze on them before the deer start working them over. Heard of lot of good reports about sugar beets recently but never tried planting them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
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    West Tennessee
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    Default

    As mentioned depends on some factors. What type plot are you wanting to plant annual or perennial? What type of equipment do you have access to. Size of plot.

    Clovers are good for the most part in most places. This time of the year is the best time to plant clovers here, better time for them to establish with less potential invasive weed growth. Can still get a decent stand of clovers here if you plant before the middle of September. Clovers can also be planted with rye grain. Have had great results with pennington's wintergrazer rye planted with clovers. Wheat might be another option to help give some cover while the clover is establishing. Chicory mixed with clovers does real well.

    If you are looking to plant an annual, some places brassicas work well and they may where you are, but the deer here don't seem to care for them, just too much other food typically still available. Tried radishes here last year and they went untouched, that was it for me for any type brassicas. Oats and other grains usually do pretty well. Winter peas are another option. Trying to get our pea patch in now, planting a mix of 3 types of peas along with some winter wheat.
    wtnhunt

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    oklahoma city
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    17,164

    Default

    if you are looking for something to plant and pop up fast so you can hunt it this year then you are better off planting cereal grains such as wheat, ryegrain, and oats. Adding some purple top turnips or other brassicas such as rape, beets, or radished will work off. Clover is a good draw but a slow growing plant. Planting a perennial clover now will not see a lot of forage production until next spring. I've planted the throw and grow but it is mainly ryegrass. If you want a premix that you can buy at walmart or another sports store I would recommend Biologics Green Patch Plus. I've always had good deer browse from this product and you can get it almost anywhere. Mixture of cereal grains, brassicas, and annual clovers.

    good luck
    todd

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