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  2. Strut10

    What....

    This for me, too. Too many years of too many gunshots, unprotected. I bet just from ONE .300 Win Mag that I used to shoot A LOT, my ears have taken in 500-750 unprotected blasts from that one gun. My ears ring non-stop now. Today...………. I wear ear protection shooting anything but a bow or an air gun. Tractors...……….chainsaws...…….leaf blower...……..power tools...………. All of them.
  3. Better luck next year, maybe. lol. Winner for the TN elk raffle was someone from Indiana.
  4. wtnhunt

    Article about CWD

    Yeah, dunno. A LOT of conflicting information out there but the general consensus seems to be to not eat deer that have cwd and some hysteria has led to the notion to not eat deer at all. TN warns to not eat infected deer in accordance with the cdc. Question is how do you know a deer is infected without having them tested. A deer may have cwd for years and show zero symptoms. We are not YET in a cwd zone, but it is very close, being in the county just south of us, and suspect there is a likelihood the zone will be expanded this year. Having a deer tested at this point would be somewhat inconvenient for us since we do not do deer processors but rather process our own. We/I spend a lot of time on processing our deer and take care that we trim away parts we don't want to eat. I can see it now, keeping a deer in a cooler on ice for 10 days to 2 weeks prior to spending the time for processing just to confirm whether it is cwd positive or negative. Then comes some questions I have on just how they sample, best as I know you have to take a head where brain tissue can be tested. A trip to a cwd zone with a head from a deer you want mounted to have them collect the sample and then a trip back to recover your head is just not convenient. Has to be a better way.............
  5. Worth reading. https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-08-17/zombie-deer-disease-rears-its-ugly-head-canada-issues-stark-warning-about-always
  6. Post your 2019 Bucks here Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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  8. OOPS WAS LOOKING AT AUG. WE ARE ONLY 28 DAYS OUT
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  10. That is something I need to be more diligent with. I honestly hardly ever wear any. Only time I did if I was shooting multiple rounds out of my .300 WSM, I should be wearing them no matter what.
  11. Mathews XT Man

    What....

    Ya, I wear them now, AFTER I CANT HEAR THINGS!... even tissue works better than nothing...if I could just get those dang "crickets" to stop chirrping🙄
  12. Good to see you back around Al. Sorry to hear the high number of dead deer, that is a shame. Dunno here if there has been an above average number of die offs or not. There have been plenty of buzzards around circling the bottoms though. Weather has been another of those years that we saw way above average precipitation making for horrible issues with parasitic insects, might be a reason for the rise in ehd.
  13. I assume this is for target practice? If so I guess what ever you are comfortable with. I use a good pair of ear muffs that I keep in my puckup for work. As for hunting with ear plugs/muffs on, I cant imagine doing that. I hunted in the woods for many years and shot more deer after first hearing them than seeing them. I suppose if you hunt in open country that would be different.
  14. Hello everyone...been a while since I checked in. I came home Wednesday from our initial stand prep trip to Missouri along with setting cams out for the 1st time. Late start this year. Before arriving, our neighbor/ranch manager called us to inform us he'd found 2 dead deer. One on us and another on a neighbor east of him. Get's worse! While preparing stands around the whole property (~1,350 ac.) we've now found a total of 10 does and fawns (2 fawns appeared to be coyote kills), a 145 class 8 point, a big 10 point, and a young 8 point. Some were mostly decomposed, some where recent. The day after we found the big 8 we passed by it again and ~25 yards away was a doe that had died in our tracks since the prior day. While going from one stand to the next, anytime we caught the scent of a rotting animal we looked for the source. There were 4 we couldn't find due to shifting winds. It's looking real bad up there. We called the local game warden to report the die offs. He'd already gotten reports of over 80 dead deer in the county. He said they figure about 10% get reported. They are really concerned this year since he confirmed that usually EHD die offs start around mid August. He started getting reports in mid July. As many of you know the midge that transmits the EHD virus is a problem until at least mid September. We'll probably be returning around the 2nd week of September to finish preparing our remaining stands and make our initial run on the cams. We'll see then how many more new ones we find and hope to see some good healthy bucks on cams. To make matters worse, here in Mississippi we've found over 20 dead deer so far this year. Most have been near where the flood waters from the Mississippi river have been falling. The flood waters didn't start falling until mid July here. We only had about 120 acres on us that flooded but neighbors to the north, western, and southwestern sides had close to 20,000 acres under water. Lots of deer migrants were on us since most of our place is high ground. Our summer food plots located closest to the flood water areas have been getting hammered. I can't say if it's EHD here too or excess stress to the deer herd and available food source. Whatever it is I've never seen die offs like this in Mississippi before. I hope y'all aren't seeing the same problem.
  15. wtnhunt

    What....

    Certain I have some damage. Worked in a shop with loud compressors that ran pretty constant with low level drum, and used saws and air tools regularly(impacts, and air chisels were probably the loudest). Listened to loud music regularly back then in my truck as well. Then worked in a factory for about five years running a pretty loud production line, they checked our hearing at least once a year and I always passed the test but kind of wonder how. I do try to use some type hearing protection these days if I can remember before I start working. Muffs in the 105+ heat index are just not convenient or very comfortable. Have found that foam backer rod in a pinch will do the trick when running saws, or driving t posts to deaden the level. Honestly think the t posts driving is harder on the ears than a lot of tools. Grinder or saw cutting steel are others that I try to remember to use something when I know I am going to be using them. Here lately been using a pair of bluetooth earbuds when running the tractors, does not cancel the sound but if they are in the ears snug enough they do definitely decrease how much of the tractor noise gets through. When shooting I do use protection, but never when hunting. Toooo many times have had my ears alert me to something coming. Be it the crows cawing or squirrels barking, nice to be able to hear those clues to get you ready and checking that direction.
  16. Whichever pair I find that are handy. Have 2 pair of howard leight amplified noise cancelling muffs, usually use those for the kids when I have them shooting. Have a pair of silencio and winchester standard muffs.
  17. Yup, half way through August and archery season opens 3 weeks from this Saturday. One week after that I begin my quest to fill a moose tag. I've been shooting the bow every day and sometimes twice a day. Gear checked and this year I'll be using a climbing stand again for the first time in years. The anticipation and preparation is half the fun.
  18. elkoholic

    switched?

    If you make it easy enough, they will come. I disagree with the thought that more hunters is a good thing. More opportunities, in the form of more access to uncrowded properties would go a long ways towards maintaining hunter numbers. Increasing the number of hunters by making it easier just causes more problems as this creates an overcrowding issue on an ever shrinking land mass accessible to hunting. Many of these "hunters" would not hunt if they had to work at it and many are not respectful of the game or the environment. Instead of a "good thing" we have more trespassing issues along with a gauntlet of other unethical practices. As we have put a high price on antlers and allowed hunting to become a monetary game, the closing off of thousands of acres to the general public to hunt has been the result. If one can not afford their own hunting property (relative or friend maybe) or afford to pay an outfitter to hunt on a property under contract, the chances are they are left to deal with overcrowded public land. If you are lucky enough to hunt the Rocky Mountains with an abundance of public land it is still possible to beat the crowds if you are willing to put in the effort to get away from the roads. Let's not make it easier. Every year there are more bow hunters here and a small percentage make it into the back country which puts more pressure on the game and eventually will result in shorter seasons or less tags. The "road hunters" would really love it if they could hunt with a crossbow here in Montana during archery season. I can see it now, just stick that crossbow out the window and fire away. I hear tell from relatives in PA that it's a happening thing there and that was before short axle to axle rigs that shoot 3 inch groups at 100 yards. The easy road is not always better. If physically you have to go crossbow, go for it, get out and hunt. If a crossbow is a choice, well, if it is legal, go for it, get out and hunt. The best part of hunting is not the kill and in that respect if one is constantly honing their hunting acumen then the choice of weapon used is academic.
  19. elkoholic

    What....

    The post on hearing protection got me to thinking (I know... not again). How often, and in what circumstances, should we be using hearing protection? Mowing the lawn? Running a chainsaw? Plowing the back forty? Then there's another big hearing destroyer and that's loud music. What brings that to mind is that last night I attended a concert at the Northwest Montana Fair and as the music started I reached into my pocket for my ear plugs and realized that I had forgotten them. I'm not sure what the decibel level was but I'm sure it was well above the 85 mark where hearing damage starts to occur. About 3 songs in the tensor tympani muscles clamped down on the ear drums decreasing the sound sensed and hopefully limiting any permanent hearing loss. The downside to the clamping down on the ear drums was that I couldn't hear normal level noises very well for several hours after the concert, but all seems back to normal today. Oh, the concert was excellent with Gretchen Wilson and Jessie G. Like the commercial says: "Protect it, or lose it" I really like being able to hear a distant elk bugle or this year it will hopefully be the approach of a grunting bull moose. A deer slipping down the trail or the wolf howling up on the ridge. Or maybe it's the call of a mile high flock of geese, the loons out on the lake, but maybe I could have heard even more if I'd used hearing protection when I was younger. Maybe I won't hear that grizzly charging through the brush until it's too late. Maybe.......
  20. I have used the same Silencio Magnum shooting muffs for the past several decades and have no complaints as they work just fine. The trick for me is to make sure they are sitting over my ears properly. On occasion, I will also use the cheap foam earplugs along with the muffs and an example would be when I'm shooting the Taurus Raging Bull 454 Casull with its ported barrel (that thing is loud!). I do not use any hearing protection when hunting with the exception of gopher (Colombian ground squirrel) hunting when using a short barreled 223 and the possibility of multiple shots, and then I use a behind the ear model of Walkers Game Ear, which muffles loud sounds while allowing me to hear normal sounds. Growing up on a farm I think I hear that. That brings up the question: Does everyone use hearing protection when working with loud machinery? I know the Game Ear (and anything similar) is a good option when working around equipment as they tone down the loud noises yet allow one to hear normal conversation (warning yells) and if not using the muff variety are a lot cooler to wear.
  21. just use a pair of shooting muffs, years of farming (Oliver Ear),...have taken it's toll here, trying to save what I have left
  22. Hey! I was wondering what hearing protection you guys use and how well does it perform... I'm currently using Big Ear custom filtered earplugs under my earmuffs just to double down. Thanks!
  23. A good trail indeed. You can watch on YouTube how to set the time and date up.
  24. Kinda the date that gets me excited, bow season only 32 days away now
  25. jbeck

    switched?

    I have taken 5 deer with the crossbow, I still prefer using my compound and I find it easier to transport to and from the stand, as well as handling in the stand. I prefer the compound over the cross bow but that is just my personal opinion. I will say I get the same satisfaction from harvesting a deer with either weapon. I let Carlee's boyfriend use the crossbow this past fall, he had terrible target panic, and I wanted to make sure he was confident when the time came to take the shot. We have had an increase in archery success rate in Pa. since the cross bow has been allowed, but we have also had a reduction in lost deer in my area. I think anything that puts more people in the stand is a good thing.
  26. jbeck

    8-9 check in

    Friday I took the wife and daughter fishing. Saturday, played golf Sunday fished in the morning early(skipped church), mid afternoon took the wife kayaking.
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