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matthew

hunting eastern coyotes

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So i live in southeastern ohio and i have been trying for coyotes for about 1.5 years and have seen them in 100 yards 3 times, (once at about 10 or 15 yards) but never got any shots

I usually hunt at night in the area that my aunt and grandparents hear them and i saw one when i was deer hunting and i was wondering how the moon cycles and weather affects their activity

Thanks for all your help

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I used to hunt them in the moonlight in winter, or stake down a dead calf, we got alot that way...we also hauled out afterbirth in the manure spreader, shot a lot of them as they were eating on that, not sure what effect if any moon phase would have...

we also ran them with hounds, ran trapline, or just ride snowmobile around with a rifle.....then stop and use mouse squeeker

Edited by Mathews XT Man

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I just started hunting coyotes and I've been bating them in this field where I hunt. there's two deer and some gross venison that was barely edible. all of this meat is under a chain link fence. The coyotes have been in there every night for almost two weeks now. It's been kinda random times there's no pattern of there movement. I don't know if I should sit and wait for them to come in or call them in. because I might have to wait all night but if they're in the area I should be able to call them in Any ideas?

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A good rule of thumb when it comes to calling coyotes, if that's the route you do chose, is 15 to 20 minutes per set on a calm day/ night, 30 to 45 mintues on a windy day/ night.

Patterning coyotes is comes down to the weather, mating season, and "outside interferences". If you see him feeding on the deer carcass one calm evening, and he don't show back up until a few days later, it may be due the fact that he felt safe while feeding on the calm evening, or the wind was blowing his direction to where if someone, or something began to approach, he would small it and be gone. The same coyote may not return to the same area unless the conditions are the same.

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Never shot coyotes when specifically hunting for them. Always on a deer hunt and one wonders on by.

Dogs are smart. Take one that has to eek its own living, and your dealing with a very smart animal. Good Luck.

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Coyotes make great practice for longer shots in the "off-season". Missouri coyote season last all-year long, with the exception from March 31st to May 31st. So when gun season on deer closes, its time to don the coyote gear and hit the ditches. And to go with Adjam5's comment on "Dogs are smart", if they observe something that has been there during many of their trips through an area, they will either detour around that area and find an alternate route or they will quit going through that area all together. Another big factor is scent, because all your cover scents work find for those big bucks, but their curiosity gets the best of them most of the time, which really makes a lot of hunters go "man, my cover scent works great", but put your cover scent against the nose of a coyote. He picks up an unusual scent, and he says "adios", because coyotes have learned that if it don't smell normal, it could kill them.

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Coyotes make great practice for longer shots in the "off-season". Missouri coyote season last all-year long, with the exception from March 31st to May 31st. So when gun season on deer closes, its time to don the coyote gear and hit the ditches. And to go with Adjam5's comment on "Dogs are smart", if they observe something that has been there during many of their trips through an area, they will either detour around that area and find an alternate route or they will quit going through that area all together. Another big factor is scent, because all your cover scents work find for those big bucks, but their curiosity gets the best of them most of the time, which really makes a lot of hunters go "man, my cover scent works great", but put your cover scent against the nose of a coyote. He picks up an unusual scent, and he says "adios", because coyotes have learned that if it don't smell normal, it could kill them.

Interestingly enough on this they can be a creature of habit. I killed three one year from the same stand/area inside a week. Had 3 come through while deer hunting one morning and popped one. Few mornings later same stand had one come through same area but behind me the other dead one still laying 50 or so yards out in front of me. Then on another morning i had gotten down from the stand and was walking had another coming through towards where the first dead one lay.

They have become very bold here hunting daylight hours around homes.

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They will use the same travel path as other animals. The scent coming from the coyote you had down could have been the reason for another coyote to come in. The reason that coyotes use the same paths as other animals, such as deer and rabbits, is because they are a food source. You're not going to go to the cabinet, if all your food is in the fridge. Coyotes are creature of habit, but those habits can be altered due to the interference of a threat. But it does sound like you had an awesome run of luck. Being elevated in a stand helps push your scent over the coyotes, or away from them. Any chance I get, I try to elevate myself.

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Made it out for two sets this weekend and no luck. Did hear a few Sunday morning early before it was legal light a long ways off. Killed a few beavers and cleared dams.

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