Sign in to follow this  
TreeWalker

BOW TUNING: Tips and Tricks

Recommended Posts

TreeWalker    10

Use this thread to post your tuning tips and tricks.....from bows to sites, to arrows and broadheads.....if you've got some useful information, let's here them so that everyone can benifit ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
buckee    15

Centre Shot

LOCATING CENTRE SHOT

How to Locate Center shot on your Compound Bow

Tools Needed:

1 Fine Point Marker

1 Tape Measure or Machinists Rule (Preferred)

1 Bow Vise or other means to hold bow in an upright position

Rubbing Alcohol

What to do & How to do it. From the string side of the limb:

Measure the full width of the upper limb at the limb tip.

Divide that measurement in half and make a small mark on the limb as close to the wheel as possible.

Do the same at the riser end of the upper limb.

Repeat Steps 1 thru 3 for the bottom limb.

Now that you have the limb center on both limbs you can easily find string center by following the next series of steps:

At the very tip of the upper limb (above the wheel) place the ruler across the limb.

Locate limb center on the ruler and note the distance from limb center to string center. This is usually about 1/8" (See Note 1.)

From the limb center mark made on the limb closest to the riser, measure and mark the string center.

Repeat step 5 thru 7 for the bottom limb.

Now that you have the string center marked, use a small amount of rubbing alcohol to remove the limb center marks. This should be done to avoid confusion.

With bow held securely in an upright position, nock an arrow and place on the rest.

Visually align the string with the marks (string center) on the limb. The marks should be hidden behind the string. If the rest is in the proper position you will see that the string runs down the center of the arrow.

If you find that when you look at the string, the marks, and the arrow all three are not lined up, simply loosen your rest and move it left or right until the string, the marks and the arrow are in line with each other. When this is achieved you will be very, very close to exact center shot of your bow.

The release shooter may initially want to set center shot with the point of the arrow directly in line with the string. A finger shooter may want to set up with the arrow point slightly outside of center shot. (See Note 2.)

Notes

Note 1: Right handed bows - string will normally be to the left of center. Left handed bows - string will normally be to the right of center.

Note 2: Right handed shooters - arrow point will be slightly left of the string. Left handed shooters - arrow point will be slightly right of the string.

Helpful Hint

For additional valuable information on bow tuning and bowhunting, check out the books Balanced Bowhunting by Dave Holt, and Bowhunter's Encyclopedia by Dwight Schuh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest adrenaline_junky   
Guest adrenaline_junky

These are all great tips that i can benifit from. The best thing i can tell you folks is to paper tune your bow. Not a lot of people do it and i never did but once i did i was impressed with the better accuracy and better arrow flight. Good luck to all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dbHunterNY    57

I found paper tuning easy.

I've just gotten into bowhunting, within the past few years. I paper tuned a bow for the first time and found it easy. Although, a trip and discussion with a local archery shop seemed to help me quite a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dbHunterNY    57

Cheap bows

I shoot a Buckmaster BTR32 bow that I got from Walmart. It seems like it jumps, torques, and isn't that smooth shooting. I know the grip is a little fatter which might be causing the torque, but is there anything I can do to make it settle down more? I have a stabilizer on it that's there but not too heavy. I've shot other bows that seem much more calm at release. Is this simply a cheap bow with no way out and I can I tune it or add stuff to make it smoother or calmer shooting? Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest bow_hunter101   
Guest bow_hunter101
I shoot a Buckmaster BTR32 bow that I got from Walmart. It seems like it jumps, torques, and isn't that smooth shooting. I know the grip is a little fatter which might be causing the torque, but is there anything I can do to make it settle down more? I have a stabilizer on it that's there but not too heavy. I've shot other bows that seem much more calm at release. Is this simply a cheap bow with no way out and I can I tune it or add stuff to make it smoother or calmer shooting? Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Dan

My sister's boyfriend has the exact same bow and he bought it from Wal-Mart. Put on some string leeches, LimbSavers, and a good vibration reducing stabilizer (such as a LimbSaver brand stabilizer). Add a couple of mini LimbSavers on your sights, rest, and quiver; and that bow shoots surprisingly silent with greatly reduced shock. It really does make all the difference in the world. Hope this helps. www.limbsaver.com/Products/Archery

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dbHunterNY    57

Thanks

I did think about getting some anti-vibration stuff for the split limbs, but haven't yet. It's served me well though, I've shot next to people with bows four times the cost of mine and shot just as well. However, I do notice its flaws now.

Thanks for the tips,

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest NavyHMC   
Guest NavyHMC

Bow Hunting Problem...

I've been shooting my Reflex bow for a little over a year. I'm right handed but am left eye dominant so upon recommendation by a bow shop I bought a right handed bow. Even after shooting my bow consistantly, when I draw back, and fix on the target, I can't seem to keep my arm from moving around a little. I'm only moving small amounts but that translate to 3-4 inches at 20 yds or more. I have never used a stabilizer since I was told they are for reducing vibration. Does anyone have any recommendations? Thanks.

Aaron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Buckslayer    10
I'm new to hunting, what is paper tuning? Thanks.

Aaron

Aaron, take a look at the tuning links posted above. They give detailed descriptions and instructions of how to paper tune.

Basically you shoot an arrow through paper to show flaws in it's flight that can be corrected with adjustment to your rest and nocking point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dbHunterNY    57

Aaron, you should actually use a stabilizer. It is an easy way to help steady your bow and better your shooting. It's not just for vibration. Also, don't skimp on weight.

As for paper tuning, it's a way to tell if your arrow is shooting straight out of your bow. You would basically have a paper attached to a frame of some sort and pulled taught at all sides. Have a stripped arrow or at least a field point on. You then stand about 3-4 yards away, align your sights, and try really hard not to move at release. You'll then see if it's a straight whole through or a hole with a tear coming from it. If you see a tear with it then you follow the bullet hole adjusting your rest. Same as you do siting in your pins by following or "chasing" the arrow.

Hope this helps, but I would still talk to an archery shop. It would help a lot.

Good luck,

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest NavyHMC   
Guest NavyHMC

Stabilizer...

Aaron, you should actually use a stabilizer. It is an easy way to help steady your bow and better your shooting. It's not just for vibration. Also, don't skimp on weight.

As for paper tuning, it's a way to tell if your arrow is shooting straight out of your bow. You would basically have a paper attached to a frame of some sort and pulled taught at all sides. Have a stripped arrow or at least a field point on. You then stand about 3-4 yards away, align your sights, and try really hard not to move at release. You'll then see if it's a straight whole through or a hole with a tear coming from it. If you see a tear with it then you follow the bullet hole adjusting your rest. Same as you do siting in your pins by following or "chasing" the arrow.

Hope this helps, but I would still talk to an archery shop. It would help a lot.

Good luck,

Dan

Thanks for the great info Dan. I'll go pick one up tomorrow. I went today and looked at them and they had three different weights and the heaviest one was roughly 5.5 ounces. It's going to take some time getting used to, but I'll give it a try. Thanks again.

Aaron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BowJoe    10

#1.

What you will need to fletch arrows.

Mouse Pad

Glue (I use either Goat Tuff or Fast Fletch)

Roll of Paper Towels

Bottle of 100% Acetone

Fletchings

Fletcher (I use the Arizona EZ Fletch)

Roll of 1-1/2" Reflective Tape

Piece of Thread 6" Long

Machinist Ruler

Scissors

Cheap Kitchen Knife

Q-Tips

Ball Point Pen

For those of you that like to fletch your own arrows:

If you buy raw shafts, you're already ahead of the game in that you don't have to clean the shafts of old rubber and glue. If you do have to clean the shafts, peel the old stuff off with an old or cheap potato knife. Not a peeler. Just lightly lay the blade on the shaft and run it back and forth at an angle. Next, moisten a paper towel with pure acetone. You can find this in the health and beauty dept. Wrap the paper towel around the area of the old fletching glue and squeeze for a minute or so. This will loosen the bond of glue to the shaft and then run the knife over it again to get even more glue up. Do this until you can't see or feel any bumps or at least not very noticeable. Run an acetone paper towel over it again and don't touch that area with bare hands. I wear sanitary gloves only after the acetone to keep the gloves from dissolving.

Next, take the thread and kitchen knife and wrap the thread around an arrow shaft until the two ends intersect. Cut the threads where they meet and you'll be left with a piece that is the diameter of the shaft. Now, measure the length of the thread with the mechanical ruler and you have your width to cut the tape. It should be around 1" for most shaft sizes give or take 1/16th". Cut each piece to about 6 inches.

Next, take your acetone cleaned arrow shaft (Don't clean the entire arrow, just the end you plan to fletch) and lay it on the table. Peel the back off the 6" piece of tape and lay it sticky side up on a mouse-pad horizontally. Now line up the end of your arrow shaft with the end of the piece of reflective tape and gently roll the arrow over the mouse-pad. This will prevent air bubbles and put it on evenly. This tape is thinner than you think and super sticky so one chance is all you get. After you get the tape on, the rest is a piece of cake.

Now, wipe the tape end with a semi, acetone moistened paper towel. A used one is fine as long as some of the acetone is evaporated. This is to prep the area for attaching the fletching.

Place a fletching in each of the 3 arms of the EZ Fletcher and then place a thin bead of glue on each fletching. Slowly release the spring to allow the arms to close and then place the lock cap down the arrow shaft. I usually spin the entire thing repeatedly so the glue doesn't run and sometimes I squeeze the fletcher if I'm not getting adequate contact between the shaft and the vanes. After a minute or two, I release the cap and spring and arms and remove the arrow from the fletcher. I immediately grab a Q-Tip and run it down the length of the vanes on both sides to absorb any excess glue and to help seal the edges of the vanes. I then place a drop of glue on each end of the vane to prevent the vanes starting to peel away from the shaft when shooting or entering a target or an animal. That's pretty much it. I just let them dry for no less than 12 hours and they are ready to shoot. Drying time depends on the type of glue and vanes you use. In case you're wondering, the reason I use reflective tape is that it makes it easier to find your arrow at night with a flashlight (even with blood on it) and since it's white during the day, it's easy to find it then too. I have 10 arrows left that I made 2 years ago and the vanes are still as good as new. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest NavyHMC   
Guest NavyHMC

Adjusting Bow Poundage...

When I first bought my bow (1.5 yrs ago) I had the draw weight set to only 50 lbs. I have gotten well adjusted to this and wanted to increase the draw weight, but a sales guy in the archery section of Gander Mt stated that I would have to change arrows, and a lot of other things. Is this true, and when should one consider increasing their draw weight? Thanks.

Aaron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8ptbuckpa    10

By increasing your draw weight you may have to change arrows to increase the spine to create less flex from the added weight.

Also you probably will have to resight in your bow because the added dw will make your bow faster creating a more direct arrow flight(less drop).

It's better to change these in the off season so you have time to practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
double_H    10

tip

I've been shooting my Reflex bow for a little over a year. I'm right handed but am left eye dominant so upon recommendation by a bow shop I bought a right handed bow. Even after shooting my bow consistantly, when I draw back, and fix on the target, I can't seem to keep my arm from moving around a little. I'm only moving small amounts but that translate to 3-4 inches at 20 yds or more. I have never used a stabilizer since I was told they are for reducing vibration. Does anyone have any recommendations? Thanks.

Aaron

try bending your bow arm a bit and turn your elbow downward. this may require shortening your draw a bit but should stabilize side to side error. good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this